Exciting innovations in tech are changing our world for the better

Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg – there are so many male leaders in tech. But what about Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper, Susan Wojcicki, Sheryl Sandberg and the decades of further women technologists?

Women are making an impact in technology, but the statistics are still shocking. According to the Women and Technology Study conducted for PwC in 2017, only 3% of women say a career in technology is their first choice, 78% of students can’t name a famous women working in technology, and only 5% of jobs  in the technology industry are held by women. 

Luckily, times are changing, and more women are being encouraged to join the ranks of innovators and creators driving remarkable technological innovations for our world.

Tech is a very cool industry for women to work

So why should women choose to work in technology?

Technology is a modern industry with a modern workplace culture. Think of all the perks at tech giant Google – free food, on-site massage therapists, dedicated volunteering time, and dog-friendly offices. But it’s not just about the physical benefits. A career in technology means working with diverse people who are some of the brightest and most innovative minds in the world.

Working in the technology setcor can mean working on some totally out-of-this-world, near-on futuristic projects that can help millions of people globally. Being part of something bigger and making a long-lasting and tangible difference to society is very appealing.

Of course, one of the biggest reasons why the technology sector can be so luring is its rapid rate of growth.With every new and exciting development comes many exciting opportunities for women to get involved.  

The technology sector is always hiring, and here are some of the key types of projects you could work on.

Robotic intelligence

Ever dreamed of a robot cooking you dinner? Time to wake up into this reality: robots are becoming more intelligent, more dextrous, and more adaptable to their environment.

Dactyl is a robot created by OpenAI – non-profit brainchild of tech leader Elon Musk – who can hold things with its fingers and learn to do tasks beyond its programming.

Brain-computer interface

Watching a series on the computer can even see the effort of reaching for the mouse to click the next episode an aspect of the past.

Develoment of a brain-computer interface is underway - a very futuristic but very possible technological development where thoughts can control the computer. 

Another Elon Musk startup, Neuralink, has already developed a system where a monkey has successfully controlled a computer with its brain. The company plans has been considering rolling out the system for humans to help with brain and spinal cord injuries.

High-speed internet

Internet has become a staple part of many people’s lives, which means we’re expecting more and more from it. One frustration is slow internet, but innovators are solving that problem too with 5G.

High-speed internet is great for individuals, and for the economy also via boosting businesses, increasing working efficiency, and making communication easier and more reliable - particularly for remote workers.

Driverless cars

So it’s not quite the sci-fi utopia of flying cars, but technology companies are developing driverless cars powered by artificial intelligence. 

It’s a mammoth task to take on – mimicking complex human actions and reactions, scaling the product to make it affordable to the mass-market – but many technology companies are determined to bring this to streets of the future. 

Plant-based meat-free food

Technology is often mainly associated with computers, devices and further hardware but technological progress can also be seen in other types of products - and can even impact of people's lives, such as their diets. Thankfully, many people have become far more environmentally conscious and the technology industry is responding to this via a wide range of plant-based, meat-free options that are lab-grown or even 3D printed.

What’s more, plant-based meat-free alternatives can be very nutritionally optimized and personalized through technology so as to suit the health needs of individuals and products can be mass-produced without a huge environmental impact - a big steps towards alleviating the food crisis worldwide.

Better for health, and better for the planet. 

Personalised cancer vaccines

As well as food, technology can also revolutionize health. One incredible leap forward for human progress is custom cancer vaccines where treatment triggers someone’s immune system to find and destroy the cancer itself.

This is truly what working in technology is all about – developing new innovations that can save lives and change the world for the better.

Learn more out about two women who are leading the way in creating these sorts of pioneering technological innovations.

Stephanie Lampkin, CEO and Founder, Blendoor

Stephanie Lampkin is the founder and CEO of Blendoor, a mobile job matching app that uses a blind recruiting strategy to overcome unconscious bias and diversify recruiting in tech companies. 

A 13 year career with technology companies like Lockheed, Microsoft, and TripAdvisor has familiarized Stephanie with the difficulties of ‘looking different’. With the help of technology and data, her aim is to prove that diversifying the tech talent pipeline will add, rather than remove, value to the industry.

Emma Yang, CEO and Founder, Timeless

Emma Yang is oa young award-winning change-maker in the technology industry. Emma is the Founder of Timeless, a mobile app that helps Alzheimer’s patients stay engaged and connected to loved ones.

Emma is a keen coder and an advocate for women in STEM. Through her work, she wants to encourage further young women like her to pursue careers in the technology industry and use their talents to make the world a better place.

Making space for women in STEM

With such rising demand for new technology, there is a significant need for women to be better supported in pursuing a career in STEM.

Educators, businesses and individual mindsets must be broadened if barriers are going to be broken, stereotypes challenged and obstacles overcome to regarding women’s participation in and contribution to innovation.

We need more coding clubs in schools. We need more female role models and mentors. We need to overcome gender bias in the workplace.

Companies also need to provide more flexible working for women, such as programmes to support women returners or better maternity leave policies.

We need more women in technology. Period.

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